And The Winner Is…

MAGIC of RIK video contest winners

[fullwidth background_color=”” background_image=”” background_parallax=”none” enable_mobile=”no” parallax_speed=”0.3″ background_repeat=”no-repeat” background_position=”left top” video_url=”” video_aspect_ratio=”16:9″ video_webm=”” video_mp4=”” video_ogv=”” video_preview_image=”” overlay_color=”” overlay_opacity=”0.5″ video_mute=”yes” video_loop=”yes” fade=”no” border_size=”0px” border_color=”” border_style=”” padding_top=”20″ padding_bottom=”20″ padding_left=”” padding_right=”” hundred_percent=”no” equal_height_columns=”no” hide_on_mobile=”no” menu_anchor=”” class=”” id=””][one_half last=”no” spacing=”yes” center_content=”no” hide_on_mobile=”no” background_color=”” background_image=”” background_repeat=”no-repeat” background_position=”left top” hover_type=”none” link=”” border_position=”all” border_size=”0px” border_color=”” border_style=”” padding=”” margin_top=”” margin_bottom=”” animation_type=”” animation_direction=”” animation_speed=”0.1″ animation_offset=”” class=”” id=””][fusion_text]A SPECIAL THANK YOU to everybody who submitted a video to our MAGIC of RIK contest. We saw and heard some amazing stories about how RIK, combined with a great book, creates an irresistible reading experience for children – even if they don’t like to read.

Because the stories were so compelling, we had a hard time picking a winner. So we decided to award a gold, silver, and bronze award, and an honorable mention. Here they are![/fusion_text][/one_half][one_half last=”yes” spacing=”yes” center_content=”no” hide_on_mobile=”no” background_color=”” background_image=”” background_repeat=”no-repeat” background_position=”left top” hover_type=”none” link=”” border_position=”all” border_size=”0px” border_color=”” border_style=”” padding=”” margin_top=”” margin_bottom=”” animation_type=”” animation_direction=”” animation_speed=”0.1″ animation_offset=”” class=”” id=””][imageframe lightbox=”no” gallery_id=”” lightbox_image=”” style_type=”none” hover_type=”none” bordercolor=”” bordersize=”0px” borderradius=”0″ stylecolor=”” align=”none” link=”/shop/” linktarget=”_self” animation_type=”0″ animation_direction=”down” animation_speed=”0.1″ animation_offset=”” hide_on_mobile=”no” class=”” id=””] [/imageframe][/one_half][/fullwidth][fullwidth background_color=”” background_image=”” background_parallax=”none” enable_mobile=”no” parallax_speed=”0.3″ background_repeat=”no-repeat” background_position=”left top” video_url=”” video_aspect_ratio=”16:9″ video_webm=”” video_mp4=”” video_ogv=”” video_preview_image=”” overlay_color=”” overlay_opacity=”0.5″ video_mute=”yes” video_loop=”yes” fade=”no” border_size=”0px” border_color=”” border_style=”” padding_top=”20″ padding_bottom=”20″ padding_left=”” padding_right=”” hundred_percent=”no” equal_height_columns=”no” hide_on_mobile=”no” menu_anchor=”” class=”” id=””][three_fourth last=”no” spacing=”yes” center_content=”no” hide_on_mobile=”no” background_color=”” background_image=”” background_repeat=”no-repeat” background_position=”left top” hover_type=”none” link=”” border_position=”all” border_size=”0px” border_color=”” border_style=”” padding=”” margin_top=”” margin_bottom=”” animation_type=”” animation_direction=”” animation_speed=”0.1″ animation_offset=”” class=”” id=””][imageframe lightbox=”no” gallery_id=”” lightbox_image=”” style_type=”none” hover_type=”none” bordercolor=”” bordersize=”0px” borderradius=”0″ stylecolor=”” align=”none” link=”https://youtu.be/QiwCQFu_9vQ” linktarget=”_blank” animation_type=”0″ animation_direction=”down” animation_speed=”0.1″ animation_offset=”” hide_on_mobile=”no” class=”” id=””] [/imageframe][/three_fourth][one_fourth last=”yes” spacing=”yes” center_content=”no” hide_on_mobile=”no” background_color=”” background_image=”” background_repeat=”no-repeat” background_position=”left top” hover_type=”none” link=”” border_position=”all” border_size=”0px” border_color=”” border_style=”” padding=”” margin_top=”” margin_bottom=”” animation_type=”” animation_direction=”” animation_speed=”0.1″ animation_offset=”” class=”” id=””][fusion_text]

Gold Award

We were completely charmed by Ben’s message and the creativity of this video. Thank you Ben and keep reading![/fusion_text][/one_fourth][/fullwidth][fullwidth background_color=”” background_image=”” background_parallax=”none” enable_mobile=”no” parallax_speed=”0.3″ background_repeat=”no-repeat” background_position=”left top” video_url=”” video_aspect_ratio=”16:9″ video_webm=”” video_mp4=”” video_ogv=”” video_preview_image=”” overlay_color=”” overlay_opacity=”0.5″ video_mute=”yes” video_loop=”yes” fade=”no” border_size=”0px” border_color=”” border_style=”” padding_top=”20″ padding_bottom=”20″ padding_left=”” padding_right=”” hundred_percent=”no” equal_height_columns=”no” hide_on_mobile=”no” menu_anchor=”” class=”” id=””][three_fourth last=”no” spacing=”yes” center_content=”no” hide_on_mobile=”no” background_color=”” background_image=”” background_repeat=”no-repeat” background_position=”left top” hover_type=”none” link=”” border_position=”all” border_size=”0px” border_color=”” border_style=”” padding=”” margin_top=”” margin_bottom=”” animation_type=”” animation_direction=”” animation_speed=”0.1″ animation_offset=”” class=”” id=””][imageframe lightbox=”no” gallery_id=”” lightbox_image=”” style_type=”none” hover_type=”none” bordercolor=”” bordersize=”0px” borderradius=”0″ stylecolor=”” align=”none” link=”https://youtu.be/Jv0TtsLRMhQ” linktarget=”_blank” animation_type=”0″ animation_direction=”down” animation_speed=”0.1″ animation_offset=”” hide_on_mobile=”no” class=”” id=””] [/imageframe][/three_fourth][one_fourth last=”yes” spacing=”yes” center_content=”no” hide_on_mobile=”no” background_color=”” background_image=”” background_repeat=”no-repeat” background_position=”left top” hover_type=”none” link=”” border_position=”all” border_size=”0px” border_color=”” border_style=”” padding=”” margin_top=”” margin_bottom=”” animation_type=”” animation_direction=”” animation_speed=”0.1″ animation_offset=”” class=”” id=””][fusion_text]

Silver Award

The story behind this video amazed us. After all the Christmas gift giving was over, guess what the reluctant readers in this family chose to do first…[/fusion_text][/one_fourth][/fullwidth][fullwidth background_color=”” background_image=”” background_parallax=”none” enable_mobile=”no” parallax_speed=”0.3″ background_repeat=”no-repeat” background_position=”left top” video_url=”” video_aspect_ratio=”16:9″ video_webm=”” video_mp4=”” video_ogv=”” video_preview_image=”” overlay_color=”” overlay_opacity=”0.5″ video_mute=”yes” video_loop=”yes” fade=”no” border_size=”0px” border_color=”” border_style=”” padding_top=”20″ padding_bottom=”20″ padding_left=”” padding_right=”” hundred_percent=”no” equal_height_columns=”no” hide_on_mobile=”no” menu_anchor=”” class=”” id=””][three_fourth last=”no” spacing=”yes” center_content=”no” hide_on_mobile=”no” background_color=”” background_image=”” background_repeat=”no-repeat” background_position=”left top” hover_type=”none” link=”” border_position=”all” border_size=”0px” border_color=”” border_style=”” padding=”” margin_top=”” margin_bottom=”” animation_type=”” animation_direction=”” animation_speed=”0.1″ animation_offset=”” class=”” id=””][imageframe lightbox=”no” gallery_id=”” lightbox_image=”” style_type=”none” hover_type=”none” bordercolor=”” bordersize=”0px” borderradius=”0″ stylecolor=”” align=”none” link=”https://youtu.be/X1kkgV3Y4jY” linktarget=”_blank” animation_type=”0″ animation_direction=”down” animation_speed=”0.1″ animation_offset=”” hide_on_mobile=”no” class=”” id=””] [/imageframe][/three_fourth][one_fourth last=”yes” spacing=”yes” center_content=”no” hide_on_mobile=”no” background_color=”” background_image=”” background_repeat=”no-repeat” background_position=”left top” hover_type=”none” link=”” border_position=”all” border_size=”0px” border_color=”” border_style=”” padding=”” margin_top=”” margin_bottom=”” animation_type=”” animation_direction=”” animation_speed=”0.1″ animation_offset=”” class=”” id=””][fusion_text]

Bronze Award

Andrew’s enthusiasm for reading with RIK is infectious. We love watching him thoroughly enjoying the experience.[/fusion_text][/one_fourth][/fullwidth][fullwidth background_color=”” background_image=”” background_parallax=”none” enable_mobile=”no” parallax_speed=”0.3″ background_repeat=”no-repeat” background_position=”left top” video_url=”” video_aspect_ratio=”16:9″ video_webm=”” video_mp4=”” video_ogv=”” video_preview_image=”” overlay_color=”” overlay_opacity=”0.5″ video_mute=”yes” video_loop=”yes” fade=”no” border_size=”0px” border_color=”” border_style=”” padding_top=”20″ padding_bottom=”20″ padding_left=”” padding_right=”” hundred_percent=”no” equal_height_columns=”no” hide_on_mobile=”no” menu_anchor=”” class=”” id=””][three_fourth last=”no” spacing=”yes” center_content=”no” hide_on_mobile=”no” background_color=”” background_image=”” background_repeat=”no-repeat” background_position=”left top” hover_type=”none” link=”” border_position=”all” border_size=”0px” border_color=”” border_style=”” padding=”” margin_top=”” margin_bottom=”” animation_type=”” animation_direction=”” animation_speed=”0.1″ animation_offset=”” class=”” id=””][imageframe lightbox=”no” gallery_id=”” lightbox_image=”” style_type=”none” hover_type=”none” bordercolor=”” bordersize=”0px” borderradius=”0″ stylecolor=”” align=”none” link=”https://youtu.be/0XIs7Xrrzq4″ linktarget=”_blank” animation_type=”0″ animation_direction=”down” animation_speed=”0.1″ animation_offset=”” hide_on_mobile=”no” class=”” id=””] [/imageframe][/three_fourth][one_fourth last=”yes” spacing=”yes” center_content=”no” hide_on_mobile=”no” background_color=”” background_image=”” background_repeat=”no-repeat” background_position=”left top” hover_type=”none” link=”” border_position=”all” border_size=”0px” border_color=”” border_style=”” padding=”” margin_top=”” margin_bottom=”” animation_type=”” animation_direction=”” animation_speed=”0.1″ animation_offset=”” class=”” id=””][fusion_text]

Honorable Mention

We loved hearing how RIK helped Savannah get over those menacing reading hurdles. “RIK kits are really fun to read and I used to not like reading, but now I do.”[/fusion_text][/one_fourth][/fullwidth]

Happy Birthday Dr. Seuss!

Dr. Seuss birthday | Read Across America

[one_full last=”yes” spacing=”yes” center_content=”no” hide_on_mobile=”no” background_color=”” background_image=”” background_repeat=”no-repeat” background_position=”left top” border_size=”0px” border_color=”” border_style=”” padding=”” margin_top=”” margin_bottom=”” animation_type=”” animation_direction=”” animation_speed=”0.1″ class=”” id=””][title size=”1″ content_align=”left” style_type=”none” sep_color=”” class=”” id=””]Happy Birthday Dr. Seuss![/title][fusion_text]March 2nd is finally here, and let me tell you why I’m so excited about it! Today marks two important events for book lovers both young and old.

The first event to celebrate today is NEA’s Read Across America. The NEA’s Read Across America is an annual program that calls for children in every community to celebrate reading.

The second reason this day is so important is because it’s also Dr. Seuss’s birthday. Happy Birthday, Dr. Seuss!

In an effort to help you celebrate this special day with your children, here are some fun facts about Dr. Seuss as well as recommended books and activities.

Special Facts About Dr. Seuss

Most every reader is familiar with Seuss-isms like, “Today you are you! That is truer than true! There is no one alive that is you-er than you!” or “The more that you read, the more things you will know. The more that you learn, the more places you’ll go.” But here are some fun facts about the Dr. you might not know.

  • His given name is Theodore Seuss Geisel, born 1904 and produced 60 books before his death in 1991.
  • What Pet Should I Get? was published in July 2015, after his death. The manuscript, along with other unpublished works we have yet to see, were discovered in his La Jolla, California home by his wife.
  • Dr. Seuss also wrote using the pen name Theo Lesieg. He came up with this name by shortening his name “Theodore” to “Theo” and then spelling “Geisel” backwards, which is “Lesieg.” Books written by “Theo Lesieg” are usually books he wrote himself, but didn’t illustrate himself. Some popular Theo Lesieg books include In a People House and The Tooth Book.
  • His first book, And to Think That I Saw It on Mulberry Street was rejected 27 times before being published. (What does this interesting fact teach about perseverance? Can you imagine if Dr. Seuss had stopped trying after being rejected on the first, second, or even the twenty-seventh time? This is a great example for children to hear about trying after failing .)
  • Green Eggs and Ham was written on a bet from a friend who claimed Seuss couldn’t write a book using 50 words or less.
  • The Cat in the Hat was written to give children something more exciting to read than Dick and Jane primers which Seuss though were insanely boring.

These facts are always fun to share with children on this special day. Dr. Seuss is full of surprises. Since he’s so full of mystery, it’s also fun to ask children what else they might know about Dr. Seuss that you might not know.

Books to Read and Activities to Do Today

Here are some of the top books I recommend reading on Dr. Seuss’s birthday along with some fun follow-up activities in order to increase comprehension.[/fusion_text][/one_full][one_third last=”no” spacing=”yes” center_content=”no” hide_on_mobile=”no” background_color=”” background_image=”” background_repeat=”no-repeat” background_position=”left top” border_size=”0px” border_color=”” border_style=”” padding=”” margin_top=”” margin_bottom=”” animation_type=”” animation_direction=”” animation_speed=”0.1″ class=”” id=””][imageframe lightbox=”no” lightbox_image=”” style_type=”none” bordercolor=”” bordersize=”0px” borderradius=”0″ stylecolor=”” align=”none” link=”” linktarget=”_self” animation_type=”0″ animation_direction=”down” animation_speed=”0.1″ hide_on_mobile=”no” class=”” id=””] [/imageframe][/one_third][two_third last=”yes” spacing=”yes” center_content=”no” hide_on_mobile=”no” background_color=”” background_image=”” background_repeat=”no-repeat” background_position=”left top” border_size=”0px” border_color=”” border_style=”” padding=”” margin_top=”” margin_bottom=”” animation_type=”” animation_direction=”” animation_speed=”0.1″ class=”” id=””][fusion_text]Read Green Eggs and Ham and then identify the 50 words he uses. The 50 words, by the way, are: a, am, and, anywhere, are, be, boat, box, car, could, dark, do, eat, eggs, fox, goat, good, green, ham, here, house, I, if, in, let, like, may, me, mouse, not, on, or, rain, Sam, say, see, so, thank, that, the, them, there, they, train, tree, try, will, with, would, you.[/fusion_text][/two_third][one_third last=”no” spacing=”yes” center_content=”no” hide_on_mobile=”no” background_color=”” background_image=”” background_repeat=”no-repeat” background_position=”left top” border_size=”0px” border_color=”” border_style=”” padding=”” margin_top=”” margin_bottom=”” animation_type=”” animation_direction=”” animation_speed=”0.1″ class=”” id=””][imageframe lightbox=”no” lightbox_image=”” style_type=”none” bordercolor=”” bordersize=”0px” borderradius=”0″ stylecolor=”” align=”none” link=”” linktarget=”_self” animation_type=”0″ animation_direction=”down” animation_speed=”0.1″ hide_on_mobile=”no” class=”” id=””] [/imageframe][/one_third][two_third last=”yes” spacing=”yes” center_content=”no” hide_on_mobile=”no” background_color=”” background_image=”” background_repeat=”no-repeat” background_position=”left top” border_size=”0px” border_color=”” border_style=”” padding=”” margin_top=”” margin_bottom=”” animation_type=”” animation_direction=”” animation_speed=”0.1″ class=”” id=””][fusion_text]Read My Many Colored Day. This is another book that isn’t well known and was published after Seuss’ death. It is illustrated by Steve Johnson and Lou Fancher. Activity: You can use this book to teach color and feelings to young children. Most people are surprised to find it was written by Dr. Seuss.[/fusion_text][/two_third][one_third last=”no” spacing=”yes” center_content=”no” hide_on_mobile=”no” background_color=”” background_image=”” background_repeat=”no-repeat” background_position=”left top” border_size=”0px” border_color=”” border_style=”” padding=”” margin_top=”” margin_bottom=”” animation_type=”” animation_direction=”” animation_speed=”0.1″ class=”” id=””][imageframe lightbox=”no” lightbox_image=”” style_type=”none” bordercolor=”” bordersize=”0px” borderradius=”0″ stylecolor=”” align=”none” link=”” linktarget=”_self” animation_type=”0″ animation_direction=”down” animation_speed=”0.1″ hide_on_mobile=”no” class=”” id=””] [/imageframe][/one_third][two_third last=”yes” spacing=”yes” center_content=”no” hide_on_mobile=”no” background_color=”” background_image=”” background_repeat=”no-repeat” background_position=”left top” border_size=”0px” border_color=”” border_style=”” padding=”” margin_top=”” margin_bottom=”” animation_type=”” animation_direction=”” animation_speed=”0.1″ class=”” id=””][fusion_text]Read Hooray for Diffendoofer Day! This is a manuscript started by Dr. Seuss and finished by Jack Prelutsky and Lane Smith. The credits on the book actually say it was written by Dr. Seuss with some help by Jack Prelutsky and Lane Smith. At the back of the book you can see some of Seuss’ original sketches he created while working on the book, which children love to see.[/fusion_text][/two_third][one_third last=”no” spacing=”yes” center_content=”no” hide_on_mobile=”no” background_color=”” background_image=”” background_repeat=”no-repeat” background_position=”left top” border_size=”0px” border_color=”” border_style=”” padding=”” margin_top=”” margin_bottom=”” animation_type=”” animation_direction=”” animation_speed=”0.1″ class=”” id=””][imageframe lightbox=”no” lightbox_image=”” style_type=”none” bordercolor=”” bordersize=”0px” borderradius=”0″ stylecolor=”” align=”none” link=”” linktarget=”_self” animation_type=”0″ animation_direction=”down” animation_speed=”0.1″ hide_on_mobile=”no” class=”” id=””] [/imageframe][/one_third][two_third last=”yes” spacing=”yes” center_content=”no” hide_on_mobile=”no” background_color=”” background_image=”” background_repeat=”no-repeat” background_position=”left top” border_size=”0px” border_color=”” border_style=”” padding=”” margin_top=”” margin_bottom=”” animation_type=”” animation_direction=”” animation_speed=”0.1″ class=”” id=””][fusion_text]It’s also fun to read The Boy on Fairfield Street: How Ted Geisel Grew Up to Become Dr. Seuss. This is written by Kathleen Krull and is about Dr. Seuss and what he was like as a young boy and man.[/fusion_text][/two_third][one_full last=”yes” spacing=”yes” center_content=”no” hide_on_mobile=”no” background_color=”” background_image=”” background_repeat=”no-repeat” background_position=”left top” border_size=”0px” border_color=”” border_style=”solid” padding=”” margin_top=”” margin_bottom=”” animation_type=”0″ animation_direction=”down” animation_speed=”0.1″ class=”” id=””][fusion_text]Participating in NEA’s Read Across America is a great way for you to celebrate Dr. Seuss’s birthday with your children. If you are interested in learning more about how to motivate young readers, NEA provides additional resources and activities they need on their calendar.[/fusion_text][/one_full][one_full last=”yes” spacing=”yes” center_content=”no” hide_on_mobile=”no” background_color=”” background_image=”” background_repeat=”no-repeat” background_position=”left top” border_size=”0px” border_color=”” border_style=”” padding=”” margin_top=”” margin_bottom=”” animation_type=”” animation_direction=”” animation_speed=”0.1″ class=”” id=””][imageframe lightbox=”no” lightbox_image=”” style_type=”none” bordercolor=”” bordersize=”0px” borderradius=”0″ stylecolor=”” align=”none” link=”” linktarget=”_self” animation_type=”0″ animation_direction=”down” animation_speed=”0.1″ hide_on_mobile=”no” class=”” id=””] [/imageframe][/one_full]

Blind Date With a Book-Fun Reading Activities For Kids

[one_full last=”yes” spacing=”yes” center_content=”no” hide_on_mobile=”no” background_color=”” background_image=”” background_repeat=”no-repeat” background_position=”left top” border_size=”0px” border_color=”” border_style=”” padding=”” margin_top=”” margin_bottom=”” animation_type=”” animation_direction=”” animation_speed=”0.1″ class=”” id=””][title size=”1″ content_align=”left” style_type=”none” sep_color=”” class=”” id=””]Blind Date With a Book—Fun Reading Activities For Kids[/title][/one_full][fusion_text]Children love going on “date night” with a parent, and it’s no secret they love surprises. So why not combine the two and have some fun with the popular Blind Date With a Book concept to make reading a fun adventure for your children and their friends.

How Does Blind Date With a Book Work?

I’m glad you asked. Blind Date With a Book has become quite the rage and combines all of the elements of a blind date, but all the fun lies in an enjoyable encounter with a book, rather than a romantic interest. In other words, one of your trusted friends (or your child’s friend, if the children are old enough) will select a book they think is a perfect match for one of your children, and you do the same for their child. Then, you wrap the book up, exchange the book, and let the fun begin.

There are several variations of this Blind Date With a Book activity that you may want to try.

Group Blind Date With a Book

The first variation is to host a group Blind Date With a Book. This is where you create a book group with your children’s friends. Each member of the group will draw a name of another member of the group.

Much like a Secret Santa, each individual will select a book for the person whose name they drew. Once they have picked a book, they will wrap it, and come to the Blind Date With a Book party. Everyone in the group will then trade the wrapped books and have a read-a-thon.

This group activity works for every age level and for any number of kids. It’s a great way for children to interact, read together, talk about books and have fun.

[/fusion_text][imageframe lightbox=”no” lightbox_image=”” style_type=”none” bordercolor=”” bordersize=”0px” borderradius=”0″ stylecolor=”” align=”none” link=”https://readingwithrik.leadpages.co/read-aloud-day-rik-giveaway7/” linktarget=”_blank” animation_type=”0″ animation_direction=”down” animation_speed=”0.1″ hide_on_mobile=”no” class=”” id=””] [/imageframe][separator style_type=”none” top_margin=”10px” bottom_margin=”” sep_color=”” border_size=”” icon=”” icon_circle=”” icon_circle_color=”” width=”” alignment=”center” class=”” id=””][fusion_text]

Blind Date With a Library Book 

Another variation of Blind Date With a Book is to select a variety of fun and popular library books that children enjoy. If you need help finding good books you can consider award winners like the Caldecott and/or Newbery, ask your local librarian for suggestions, or ask us for a recommendation by posting your question in the comments or on the Reading With RIK Facebook page.

Once you have several age-appropriate books, you can wrap them up and host the party. The children will choose a book without knowing what book it is. Since you’re using library books, you’ll probably want to choose picture books or quick reads that the children can enjoy at the party and leave with you before they head home.

16036025_m

Themed Blind Date With a Book

If the option above goes well, you can expand on this idea and offer a themed Blind Date With a Book party each month. For example, in February you could choose books about Valentine’s Day, Presidents’ Day or Black History Month. In July, you can select patriotic books. In October, you can pick Halloween, fall or mystery books. The options for themes are endless and your children will look forward to this activity each month.

Blind Date With a Book Tea Party and Read Aloud 

What child doesn’t love a good tea party? Consider inviting a few friends over, wrapping up a book with the intent of reading it aloud to them during the tea party. Set up a table with your beverage of choice, themed decorations, and delicious treats.

If your children like dressing up, you can include some fun costumes that relate to the theme of the book. Once you are done, have the children act out the story. This will help them with comprehension and imaginative play.

Blind Date With a Book Classroom Style

Teachers can have a great time with this concept in their classrooms. Give the students a brown paper bag and have them secretly visit the bookshelves in your classroom to select a book they’d like another student in the class to read. Have the students conceal their book choice in the brown paper bag and write on the bag a few descriptive words about the book to entice the other students to want to read it. Display the paper bags and let the students choose their book. After the students have read their books give them a chance, through discussions or in writing, to express their impressions of the book they chose.

16035996_m

We’d love to hear your ideas of Blind Date With a Book activities for kids. Feel free to leave a suggestion in the comments. For more help with book recommendations, or to learn more about Reading With RIK™ and how we’re making reading extra fun, click here.[/fusion_text][separator style_type=”none” top_margin=”” bottom_margin=”” sep_color=”” border_size=”” icon=”” icon_circle=”” icon_circle_color=”” width=”” alignment=”” class=”” id=””]

Books to Teach Kids About MLK and Civil Rights

Martin Luther King, Jr. speaking at interfaith civil rights rally, San Francisco Cow Palace, June 30 1964

[one_full last=”yes” spacing=”yes” center_content=”no” hide_on_mobile=”no” background_color=”” background_image=”” background_repeat=”no-repeat” background_position=”left top” border_size=”0px” border_color=”” border_style=”” padding=”” margin_top=”” margin_bottom=”” animation_type=”” animation_direction=”” animation_speed=”0.1″ class=”” id=””][title size=”1″ content_align=”left” style_type=”none” sep_color=”” class=”” id=””]Books to Teach Kids About MLK and Civil Rights[/title][fusion_text]Looking for some great books you can use to teach your children about Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. and the civil rights movement? Here are some of the titles I used in my school library to teach about this important time in our history. It’s a list of well-written, engaging and informative books you can also refer to during Black History month in February. Of course, there are many more titles than this to read, but these are a few of my favorites.

Why not read the books with your children and then join with the nation in making Martin Luther King Jr. Day, Jan 18th, a day of service? What a great way to teach your children and honor the memory of Dr. King.

Life’s most persistent and urgent question is, ‘What are you doing for others?
Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

[/fusion_text][/one_full][one_full last=”yes” spacing=”yes” center_content=”no” hide_on_mobile=”no” background_color=”” background_image=”” background_repeat=”no-repeat” background_position=”left top” border_size=”0px” border_color=”” border_style=”” padding=”” margin_top=”” margin_bottom=”” animation_type=”” animation_direction=”” animation_speed=”0.1″ class=”” id=””][title size=”2″ content_align=”left” style_type=”underline” sep_color=”” class=”” id=””]Books About Martin Luther King, Jr.[/title][/one_full][one_third last=”no” spacing=”yes” center_content=”no” hide_on_mobile=”no” background_color=”” background_image=”” background_repeat=”no-repeat” background_position=”left top” border_size=”0px” border_color=”” border_style=”” padding=”” margin_top=”” margin_bottom=”” animation_type=”” animation_direction=”” animation_speed=”0.1″ class=”” id=””][imageframe lightbox=”no” lightbox_image=”” style_type=”none” bordercolor=”” bordersize=”0px” borderradius=”0″ stylecolor=”” align=”none” link=”” linktarget=”_self” animation_type=”0″ animation_direction=”down” animation_speed=”0.1″ hide_on_mobile=”no” class=”” id=””] [/imageframe][/one_third][two_third last=”yes” spacing=”yes” center_content=”no” hide_on_mobile=”no” background_color=”” background_image=”” background_repeat=”no-repeat” background_position=”left top” border_size=”0px” border_color=”” border_style=”” padding=”” margin_top=”” margin_bottom=”” animation_type=”” animation_direction=”” animation_speed=”0.1″ class=”” id=””][fusion_text]

Martin’s Big Words

by Doreen Rappaport[/fusion_text][/two_third][one_third last=”no” spacing=”yes” center_content=”no” hide_on_mobile=”no” background_color=”” background_image=”” background_repeat=”no-repeat” background_position=”left top” border_size=”0px” border_color=”” border_style=”” padding=”” margin_top=”” margin_bottom=”” animation_type=”” animation_direction=”” animation_speed=”0.1″ class=”” id=””][imageframe lightbox=”no” lightbox_image=”” style_type=”none” bordercolor=”” bordersize=”0px” borderradius=”0″ stylecolor=”” align=”none” link=”” linktarget=”_self” animation_type=”0″ animation_direction=”down” animation_speed=”0.1″ hide_on_mobile=”no” class=”” id=””] [/imageframe][/one_third][two_third last=”yes” spacing=”yes” center_content=”no” hide_on_mobile=”no” background_color=”” background_image=”” background_repeat=”no-repeat” background_position=”left top” border_size=”0px” border_color=”” border_style=”” padding=”” margin_top=”” margin_bottom=”” animation_type=”” animation_direction=”” animation_speed=”0.1″ class=”” id=””][fusion_text]

I Have a Dream: Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. 

(excerpts of his famous speech) illustrated by Kadir Nelson[/fusion_text][/two_third][one_third last=”no” spacing=”yes” center_content=”no” hide_on_mobile=”no” background_color=”” background_image=”” background_repeat=”no-repeat” background_position=”left top” border_size=”0px” border_color=”” border_style=”” padding=”” margin_top=”” margin_bottom=”” animation_type=”” animation_direction=”” animation_speed=”0.1″ class=”” id=””][imageframe lightbox=”no” lightbox_image=”” style_type=”none” bordercolor=”” bordersize=”0px” borderradius=”0″ stylecolor=”” align=”none” link=”” linktarget=”_self” animation_type=”0″ animation_direction=”down” animation_speed=”0.1″ hide_on_mobile=”no” class=”” id=””] [/imageframe][/one_third][two_third last=”yes” spacing=”yes” center_content=”no” hide_on_mobile=”no” background_color=”” background_image=”” background_repeat=”no-repeat” background_position=”left top” border_size=”0px” border_color=”” border_style=”” padding=”” margin_top=”” margin_bottom=”” animation_type=”” animation_direction=”” animation_speed=”0.1″ class=”” id=””][fusion_text]

My Brother Martin

by Christine King Farris[/fusion_text][/two_third][one_third last=”no” spacing=”yes” center_content=”no” hide_on_mobile=”no” background_color=”” background_image=”” background_repeat=”no-repeat” background_position=”left top” border_size=”0px” border_color=”” border_style=”” padding=”” margin_top=”” margin_bottom=”” animation_type=”” animation_direction=”” animation_speed=”0.1″ class=”” id=””][imageframe lightbox=”no” lightbox_image=”” style_type=”none” bordercolor=”” bordersize=”0px” borderradius=”0″ stylecolor=”” align=”none” link=”” linktarget=”_self” animation_type=”0″ animation_direction=”down” animation_speed=”0.1″ hide_on_mobile=”no” class=”” id=””] [/imageframe][/one_third][two_third last=”yes” spacing=”yes” center_content=”no” hide_on_mobile=”no” background_color=”” background_image=”” background_repeat=”no-repeat” background_position=”left top” border_size=”0px” border_color=”” border_style=”” padding=”” margin_top=”” margin_bottom=”” animation_type=”” animation_direction=”” animation_speed=”0.1″ class=”” id=””][fusion_text]

March On!

by Christine King Farris[/fusion_text][/two_third][one_third last=”no” spacing=”yes” center_content=”no” hide_on_mobile=”no” background_color=”” background_image=”” background_repeat=”no-repeat” background_position=”left top” border_size=”0px” border_color=”” border_style=”” padding=”” margin_top=”” margin_bottom=”” animation_type=”” animation_direction=”” animation_speed=”0.1″ class=”” id=””][imageframe lightbox=”no” lightbox_image=”” style_type=”none” bordercolor=”” bordersize=”0px” borderradius=”0″ stylecolor=”” align=”none” link=”” linktarget=”_self” animation_type=”0″ animation_direction=”down” animation_speed=”0.1″ hide_on_mobile=”no” class=”” id=””] [/imageframe][/one_third][two_third last=”yes” spacing=”yes” center_content=”no” hide_on_mobile=”no” background_color=”” background_image=”” background_repeat=”no-repeat” background_position=”left top” border_size=”0px” border_color=”” border_style=”” padding=”” margin_top=”” margin_bottom=”” animation_type=”” animation_direction=”” animation_speed=”0.1″ class=”” id=””][fusion_text]

My Daddy, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

by Martin Luther King III[/fusion_text][/two_third][separator style_type=”single” top_margin=”” bottom_margin=”” sep_color=”” border_size=”” icon=”” icon_circle=”” icon_circle_color=”” width=”” alignment=”center” class=”” id=””][one_full last=”yes” spacing=”yes” center_content=”no” hide_on_mobile=”no” background_color=”” background_image=”” background_repeat=”no-repeat” background_position=”left top” border_size=”0px” border_color=”” border_style=”” padding=”” margin_top=”” margin_bottom=”” animation_type=”” animation_direction=”” animation_speed=”0.1″ class=”” id=””][title size=”2″ content_align=”left” style_type=”underline” sep_color=”” class=”” id=””]Books About Ruby Bridges[/title][/one_full][fusion_text]I like these two books about Ruby Bridges because they are written by her. Children are always impressed by that. I had the privilege of meeting Ruby Bridges at an event this fall and will never forget that life-changing experience. Children always want to know if Ruby is still alive. Yes, she definitely is and here is a short video you can show them of her telling her story.[/fusion_text][one_third last=”no” spacing=”yes” center_content=”no” hide_on_mobile=”no” background_color=”” background_image=”” background_repeat=”no-repeat” background_position=”left top” border_size=”0px” border_color=”” border_style=”” padding=”” margin_top=”” margin_bottom=”” animation_type=”” animation_direction=”” animation_speed=”0.1″ class=”” id=””][imageframe lightbox=”no” lightbox_image=”” style_type=”none” bordercolor=”” bordersize=”0px” borderradius=”0″ stylecolor=”” align=”none” link=”” linktarget=”_self” animation_type=”0″ animation_direction=”down” animation_speed=”0.1″ hide_on_mobile=”no” class=”” id=””] [/imageframe][/one_third][two_third last=”yes” spacing=”yes” center_content=”no” hide_on_mobile=”no” background_color=”” background_image=”” background_repeat=”no-repeat” background_position=”left top” border_size=”0px” border_color=”” border_style=”” padding=”” margin_top=”” margin_bottom=”” animation_type=”” animation_direction=”” animation_speed=”0.1″ class=”” id=””][fusion_text]

Through My Eyes

by Ruby Bridges[/fusion_text][/two_third][one_third last=”no” spacing=”yes” center_content=”no” hide_on_mobile=”no” background_color=”” background_image=”” background_repeat=”no-repeat” background_position=”left top” border_size=”0px” border_color=”” border_style=”” padding=”” margin_top=”” margin_bottom=”” animation_type=”” animation_direction=”” animation_speed=”0.1″ class=”” id=””][imageframe lightbox=”no” lightbox_image=”” style_type=”none” bordercolor=”” bordersize=”0px” borderradius=”0″ stylecolor=”” align=”none” link=”” linktarget=”_self” animation_type=”0″ animation_direction=”down” animation_speed=”0.1″ hide_on_mobile=”no” class=”” id=””] [/imageframe][/one_third][two_third last=”yes” spacing=”yes” center_content=”no” hide_on_mobile=”no” background_color=”” background_image=”” background_repeat=”no-repeat” background_position=”left top” border_size=”0px” border_color=”” border_style=”” padding=”” margin_top=”” margin_bottom=”” animation_type=”” animation_direction=”” animation_speed=”0.1″ class=”” id=””][fusion_text]

Ruby Bridges Goes To School: My True Story

by Ruby Bridges[/fusion_text][/two_third][separator style_type=”single” top_margin=”” bottom_margin=”” sep_color=”” border_size=”” icon=”” icon_circle=”” icon_circle_color=”” width=”” alignment=”center” class=”” id=””][one_full last=”yes” spacing=”yes” center_content=”no” hide_on_mobile=”no” background_color=”” background_image=”” background_repeat=”no-repeat” background_position=”left top” border_size=”0px” border_color=”” border_style=”” padding=”” margin_top=”” margin_bottom=”” animation_type=”” animation_direction=”” animation_speed=”0.1″ class=”” id=””][title size=”2″ content_align=”left” style_type=”underline” sep_color=”” class=”” id=””]Books about Rosa Parks[/title][/one_full][one_third last=”no” spacing=”yes” center_content=”no” hide_on_mobile=”no” background_color=”” background_image=”” background_repeat=”no-repeat” background_position=”left top” border_size=”0px” border_color=”” border_style=”” padding=”” margin_top=”” margin_bottom=”” animation_type=”” animation_direction=”” animation_speed=”0.1″ class=”” id=””][imageframe lightbox=”no” lightbox_image=”” style_type=”none” bordercolor=”” bordersize=”0px” borderradius=”0″ stylecolor=”” align=”none” link=”” linktarget=”_self” animation_type=”0″ animation_direction=”down” animation_speed=”0.1″ hide_on_mobile=”no” class=”” id=””] [/imageframe][/one_third][two_third last=”yes” spacing=”yes” center_content=”no” hide_on_mobile=”no” background_color=”” background_image=”” background_repeat=”no-repeat” background_position=”left top” border_size=”0px” border_color=”” border_style=”” padding=”” margin_top=”” margin_bottom=”” animation_type=”” animation_direction=”” animation_speed=”0.1″ class=”” id=””][fusion_text]

I Am Rosa Parks

by Brad Meltzer

(You may want to check out all of the I Am books by Brad Meltzer. They are great biographies for children.)[/fusion_text][/two_third][one_third last=”no” spacing=”yes” center_content=”no” hide_on_mobile=”no” background_color=”” background_image=”” background_repeat=”no-repeat” background_position=”left top” border_size=”0px” border_color=”” border_style=”” padding=”” margin_top=”” margin_bottom=”” animation_type=”” animation_direction=”” animation_speed=”0.1″ class=”” id=””][imageframe lightbox=”no” lightbox_image=”” style_type=”none” bordercolor=”” bordersize=”0px” borderradius=”0″ stylecolor=”” align=”none” link=”” linktarget=”_self” animation_type=”0″ animation_direction=”down” animation_speed=”0.1″ hide_on_mobile=”no” class=”” id=””] [/imageframe][/one_third][two_third last=”yes” spacing=”yes” center_content=”no” hide_on_mobile=”no” background_color=”” background_image=”” background_repeat=”no-repeat” background_position=”left top” border_size=”0px” border_color=”” border_style=”” padding=”” margin_top=”” margin_bottom=”” animation_type=”” animation_direction=”” animation_speed=”0.1″ class=”” id=””][fusion_text]

Rosa

by Nikki Giovanni[/fusion_text][/two_third][separator style_type=”single” top_margin=”” bottom_margin=”” sep_color=”” border_size=”” icon=”” icon_circle=”” icon_circle_color=”” width=”” alignment=”center” class=”” id=””][one_full last=”yes” spacing=”yes” center_content=”no” hide_on_mobile=”no” background_color=”” background_image=”” background_repeat=”no-repeat” background_position=”left top” border_size=”0px” border_color=”” border_style=”” padding=”” margin_top=”” margin_bottom=”” animation_type=”” animation_direction=”” animation_speed=”0.1″ class=”” id=””][title size=”2″ content_align=”left” style_type=”underline” sep_color=”” class=”” id=””]Books About Marian Anderson[/title][/one_full][one_third last=”no” spacing=”yes” center_content=”no” hide_on_mobile=”no” background_color=”” background_image=”” background_repeat=”no-repeat” background_position=”left top” border_size=”0px” border_color=”” border_style=”” padding=”” margin_top=”” margin_bottom=”” animation_type=”” animation_direction=”” animation_speed=”0.1″ class=”” id=””][imageframe lightbox=”no” lightbox_image=”” style_type=”none” bordercolor=”” bordersize=”0px” borderradius=”0″ stylecolor=”” align=”none” link=”” linktarget=”_self” animation_type=”0″ animation_direction=”down” animation_speed=”0.1″ hide_on_mobile=”no” class=”” id=””] [/imageframe][/one_third][two_third last=”yes” spacing=”yes” center_content=”no” hide_on_mobile=”no” background_color=”” background_image=”” background_repeat=”no-repeat” background_position=”left top” border_size=”0px” border_color=”” border_style=”” padding=”” margin_top=”” margin_bottom=”” animation_type=”” animation_direction=”” animation_speed=”0.1″ class=”” id=””][fusion_text]

When Marian Sang

by Pam Munoz Ryan[/fusion_text][/two_third][one_third last=”no” spacing=”yes” center_content=”no” hide_on_mobile=”no” background_color=”” background_image=”” background_repeat=”no-repeat” background_position=”left top” border_size=”0px” border_color=”” border_style=”” padding=”” margin_top=”” margin_bottom=”” animation_type=”” animation_direction=”” animation_speed=”0.1″ class=”” id=””][imageframe lightbox=”no” lightbox_image=”” style_type=”none” bordercolor=”” bordersize=”0px” borderradius=”0″ stylecolor=”” align=”none” link=”” linktarget=”_self” animation_type=”0″ animation_direction=”down” animation_speed=”0.1″ hide_on_mobile=”no” class=”” id=””] [/imageframe][/one_third][two_third last=”yes” spacing=”yes” center_content=”no” hide_on_mobile=”no” background_color=”” background_image=”” background_repeat=”no-repeat” background_position=”left top” border_size=”0px” border_color=”” border_style=”” padding=”” margin_top=”” margin_bottom=”” animation_type=”” animation_direction=”” animation_speed=”0.1″ class=”” id=””][fusion_text]

The Voice that Challenged a Nation: Marian Anderson and the Struggle for Equal Rights

by Russell Freedman[/fusion_text][/two_third][separator style_type=”single” top_margin=”” bottom_margin=”” sep_color=”” border_size=”” icon=”” icon_circle=”” icon_circle_color=”” width=”” alignment=”center” class=”” id=””][one_full last=”yes” spacing=”yes” center_content=”no” hide_on_mobile=”no” background_color=”” background_image=”” background_repeat=”no-repeat” background_position=”left top” border_size=”0px” border_color=”” border_style=”” padding=”” margin_top=”” margin_bottom=”” animation_type=”” animation_direction=”” animation_speed=”0.1″ class=”” id=””][title size=”2″ content_align=”left” style_type=”underline” sep_color=”” class=”” id=””]More Favorites[/title][/one_full][one_third last=”no” spacing=”yes” center_content=”no” hide_on_mobile=”no” background_color=”” background_image=”” background_repeat=”no-repeat” background_position=”left top” border_size=”0px” border_color=”” border_style=”” padding=”” margin_top=”” margin_bottom=”” animation_type=”” animation_direction=”” animation_speed=”0.1″ class=”” id=””][imageframe lightbox=”no” lightbox_image=”” style_type=”none” bordercolor=”” bordersize=”0px” borderradius=”0″ stylecolor=”” align=”none” link=”” linktarget=”_self” animation_type=”0″ animation_direction=”down” animation_speed=”0.1″ hide_on_mobile=”no” class=”” id=””] [/imageframe][/one_third][two_third last=”yes” spacing=”yes” center_content=”no” hide_on_mobile=”no” background_color=”” background_image=”” background_repeat=”no-repeat” background_position=”left top” border_size=”0px” border_color=”” border_style=”” padding=”” margin_top=”” margin_bottom=”” animation_type=”” animation_direction=”” animation_speed=”0.1″ class=”” id=””][fusion_text]

Riding to Washington

by Gwenyth Swain

[/fusion_text][/two_third][one_third last=”no” spacing=”yes” center_content=”no” hide_on_mobile=”no” background_color=”” background_image=”” background_repeat=”no-repeat” background_position=”left top” border_size=”0px” border_color=”” border_style=”” padding=”” margin_top=”” margin_bottom=”” animation_type=”” animation_direction=”” animation_speed=”0.1″ class=”” id=””][imageframe lightbox=”no” lightbox_image=”” style_type=”none” bordercolor=”” bordersize=”0px” borderradius=”0″ stylecolor=”” align=”none” link=”” linktarget=”_self” animation_type=”0″ animation_direction=”down” animation_speed=”0.1″ hide_on_mobile=”no” class=”” id=””] [/imageframe][/one_third][two_third last=”yes” spacing=”yes” center_content=”no” hide_on_mobile=”no” background_color=”” background_image=”” background_repeat=”no-repeat” background_position=”left top” border_size=”0px” border_color=”” border_style=”” padding=”” margin_top=”” margin_bottom=”” animation_type=”” animation_direction=”” animation_speed=”0.1″ class=”” id=””][fusion_text]

Separate is Never Equal

by Duncan Tonatiuh

[/fusion_text][/two_third][one_third last=”no” spacing=”yes” center_content=”no” hide_on_mobile=”no” background_color=”” background_image=”” background_repeat=”no-repeat” background_position=”left top” border_size=”0px” border_color=”” border_style=”” padding=”” margin_top=”” margin_bottom=”” animation_type=”” animation_direction=”” animation_speed=”0.1″ class=”” id=””][imageframe lightbox=”no” lightbox_image=”” style_type=”none” bordercolor=”” bordersize=”0px” borderradius=”0″ stylecolor=”” align=”none” link=”” linktarget=”_self” animation_type=”0″ animation_direction=”down” animation_speed=”0.1″ hide_on_mobile=”no” class=”” id=””] [/imageframe][/one_third][two_third last=”yes” spacing=”yes” center_content=”no” hide_on_mobile=”no” background_color=”” background_image=”” background_repeat=”no-repeat” background_position=”left top” border_size=”0px” border_color=”” border_style=”” padding=”” margin_top=”” margin_bottom=”” animation_type=”” animation_direction=”” animation_speed=”0.1″ class=”” id=””][fusion_text]

Freedom on the Menu

by Carole Boston Weatherford

[/fusion_text][/two_third][one_third last=”no” spacing=”yes” center_content=”no” hide_on_mobile=”no” background_color=”” background_image=”” background_repeat=”no-repeat” background_position=”left top” border_size=”0px” border_color=”” border_style=”” padding=”” margin_top=”” margin_bottom=”” animation_type=”” animation_direction=”” animation_speed=”0.1″ class=”” id=””][imageframe lightbox=”no” lightbox_image=”” style_type=”none” bordercolor=”” bordersize=”0px” borderradius=”0″ stylecolor=”” align=”none” link=”” linktarget=”_self” animation_type=”0″ animation_direction=”down” animation_speed=”0.1″ hide_on_mobile=”no” class=”” id=””] [/imageframe][/one_third][two_third last=”yes” spacing=”yes” center_content=”no” hide_on_mobile=”no” background_color=”” background_image=”” background_repeat=”no-repeat” background_position=”left top” border_size=”0px” border_color=”” border_style=”” padding=”” margin_top=”” margin_bottom=”” animation_type=”” animation_direction=”” animation_speed=”0.1″ class=”” id=””][fusion_text]

Sit-In: How Four Friends Stood Up

by Sitting Down by Andrea Pinkney

[/fusion_text][/two_third][one_third last=”no” spacing=”yes” center_content=”no” hide_on_mobile=”no” background_color=”” background_image=”” background_repeat=”no-repeat” background_position=”left top” border_size=”0px” border_color=”” border_style=”” padding=”” margin_top=”” margin_bottom=”” animation_type=”” animation_direction=”” animation_speed=”0.1″ class=”” id=””][imageframe lightbox=”no” lightbox_image=”” style_type=”none” bordercolor=”” bordersize=”0px” borderradius=”0″ stylecolor=”” align=”none” link=”” linktarget=”_self” animation_type=”0″ animation_direction=”down” animation_speed=”0.1″ hide_on_mobile=”no” class=”” id=””] [/imageframe][/one_third][two_third last=”yes” spacing=”yes” center_content=”no” hide_on_mobile=”no” background_color=”” background_image=”” background_repeat=”no-repeat” background_position=”left top” border_size=”0px” border_color=”” border_style=”” padding=”” margin_top=”” margin_bottom=”” animation_type=”” animation_direction=”” animation_speed=”0.1″ class=”” id=””][fusion_text]

Martin and Mahalia

by Andrea Pinkney

[/fusion_text][/two_third][one_third last=”no” spacing=”yes” center_content=”no” hide_on_mobile=”no” background_color=”” background_image=”” background_repeat=”no-repeat” background_position=”left top” border_size=”0px” border_color=”” border_style=”” padding=”” margin_top=”” margin_bottom=”” animation_type=”” animation_direction=”” animation_speed=”0.1″ class=”” id=””][imageframe lightbox=”no” lightbox_image=”” style_type=”none” bordercolor=”” bordersize=”0px” borderradius=”0″ stylecolor=”” align=”none” link=”” linktarget=”_self” animation_type=”0″ animation_direction=”down” animation_speed=”0.1″ hide_on_mobile=”no” class=”” id=””] [/imageframe][/one_third][two_third last=”yes” spacing=”yes” center_content=”no” hide_on_mobile=”no” background_color=”” background_image=”” background_repeat=”no-repeat” background_position=”left top” border_size=”0px” border_color=”” border_style=”” padding=”” margin_top=”” margin_bottom=”” animation_type=”” animation_direction=”” animation_speed=”0.1″ class=”” id=””][fusion_text]

Remember: The Journey to School Integration

by Toni Morrison

[/fusion_text][/two_third][separator style_type=”single” top_margin=”” bottom_margin=”” sep_color=”” border_size=”” icon=”” icon_circle=”” icon_circle_color=”” width=”” alignment=”center” class=”” id=””][one_full last=”yes” spacing=”yes” center_content=”no” hide_on_mobile=”no” background_color=”” background_image=”” background_repeat=”no-repeat” background_position=”left top” border_size=”0px” border_color=”” border_style=”” padding=”” margin_top=”” margin_bottom=”” animation_type=”” animation_direction=”” animation_speed=”0.1″ class=”” id=””][title size=”2″ content_align=”left” style_type=”underline” sep_color=”” class=”” id=””]For Older Children And Young Adults[/title][/one_full][one_third last=”no” spacing=”yes” center_content=”no” hide_on_mobile=”no” background_color=”” background_image=”” background_repeat=”no-repeat” background_position=”left top” border_size=”0px” border_color=”” border_style=”” padding=”” margin_top=”” margin_bottom=”” animation_type=”” animation_direction=”” animation_speed=”0.1″ class=”” id=””][imageframe lightbox=”no” lightbox_image=”” style_type=”none” bordercolor=”” bordersize=”0px” borderradius=”0″ stylecolor=”” align=”none” link=”” linktarget=”_self” animation_type=”0″ animation_direction=”down” animation_speed=”0.1″ hide_on_mobile=”no” class=”” id=””] [/imageframe][/one_third][two_third last=”yes” spacing=”yes” center_content=”no” hide_on_mobile=”no” background_color=”” background_image=”” background_repeat=”no-repeat” background_position=”left top” border_size=”0px” border_color=”” border_style=”” padding=”” margin_top=”” margin_bottom=”” animation_type=”” animation_direction=”” animation_speed=”0.1″ class=”” id=””][fusion_text]

Getting Away with Murder

by Chris Crowe

[/fusion_text][/two_third][one_third last=”no” spacing=”yes” center_content=”no” hide_on_mobile=”no” background_color=”” background_image=”” background_repeat=”no-repeat” background_position=”left top” border_size=”0px” border_color=”” border_style=”” padding=”” margin_top=”” margin_bottom=”” animation_type=”” animation_direction=”” animation_speed=”0.1″ class=”” id=””][imageframe lightbox=”no” lightbox_image=”” style_type=”none” bordercolor=”” bordersize=”0px” borderradius=”0″ stylecolor=”” align=”none” link=”” linktarget=”_self” animation_type=”0″ animation_direction=”down” animation_speed=”0.1″ hide_on_mobile=”no” class=”” id=””] [/imageframe][/one_third][two_third last=”yes” spacing=”yes” center_content=”no” hide_on_mobile=”no” background_color=”” background_image=”” background_repeat=”no-repeat” background_position=”left top” border_size=”0px” border_color=”” border_style=”” padding=”” margin_top=”” margin_bottom=”” animation_type=”” animation_direction=”” animation_speed=”0.1″ class=”” id=””][fusion_text]

Freedom Riders: John Lewis and Jim Zwerg and the Front Lines of the Civil Rights Movement

by Ann Bausum

[/fusion_text][/two_third][one_third last=”no” spacing=”yes” center_content=”no” hide_on_mobile=”no” background_color=”” background_image=”” background_repeat=”no-repeat” background_position=”left top” border_size=”0px” border_color=”” border_style=”” padding=”” margin_top=”” margin_bottom=”” animation_type=”” animation_direction=”” animation_speed=”0.1″ class=”” id=””][imageframe lightbox=”no” lightbox_image=”” style_type=”none” bordercolor=”” bordersize=”0px” borderradius=”0″ stylecolor=”” align=”none” link=”” linktarget=”_self” animation_type=”0″ animation_direction=”down” animation_speed=”0.1″ hide_on_mobile=”no” class=”” id=””] [/imageframe][/one_third][two_third last=”yes” spacing=”yes” center_content=”no” hide_on_mobile=”no” background_color=”” background_image=”” background_repeat=”no-repeat” background_position=”left top” border_size=”0px” border_color=”” border_style=”” padding=”” margin_top=”” margin_bottom=”” animation_type=”” animation_direction=”” animation_speed=”0.1″ class=”” id=””][fusion_text]

Freedom Walkers: The Story of the Montgomery Bus Boycott

by Russell Freedman

[/fusion_text][/two_third][one_third last=”no” spacing=”yes” center_content=”no” hide_on_mobile=”no” background_color=”” background_image=”” background_repeat=”no-repeat” background_position=”left top” border_size=”0px” border_color=”” border_style=”solid” padding=”” margin_top=”” margin_bottom=”” animation_type=”0″ animation_direction=”down” animation_speed=”0.1″ class=”” id=””][imageframe lightbox=”no” lightbox_image=”” style_type=”none” bordercolor=”” bordersize=”0px” borderradius=”0″ stylecolor=”” align=”none” link=”” linktarget=”_self” animation_type=”0″ animation_direction=”down” animation_speed=”0.1″ hide_on_mobile=”no” class=”” id=””] [/imageframe][/one_third][two_third last=”yes” spacing=”yes” center_content=”no” hide_on_mobile=”no” background_color=”” background_image=”” background_repeat=”no-repeat” background_position=”left top” border_size=”0px” border_color=”” border_style=”” padding=”” margin_top=”” margin_bottom=”” animation_type=”” animation_direction=”” animation_speed=”0.1″ class=”” id=””][fusion_text]

The Port Chicago 50: Disaster, Mutiny, and the Fight for Civil Rights

by Steve Sheinkin

[/fusion_text][/two_third][one_third last=”no” spacing=”yes” center_content=”no” hide_on_mobile=”no” background_color=”” background_image=”” background_repeat=”no-repeat” background_position=”left top” border_size=”0px” border_color=”” border_style=”” padding=”” margin_top=”” margin_bottom=”” animation_type=”” animation_direction=”” animation_speed=”0.1″ class=”” id=””][imageframe lightbox=”no” lightbox_image=”” style_type=”none” bordercolor=”” bordersize=”0px” borderradius=”0″ stylecolor=”” align=”none” link=”” linktarget=”_self” animation_type=”0″ animation_direction=”down” animation_speed=”0.1″ hide_on_mobile=”no” class=”” id=””] [/imageframe][/one_third][two_third last=”yes” spacing=”yes” center_content=”no” hide_on_mobile=”no” background_color=”” background_image=”” background_repeat=”no-repeat” background_position=”left top” border_size=”0px” border_color=”” border_style=”” padding=”” margin_top=”” margin_bottom=”” animation_type=”” animation_direction=”” animation_speed=”0.1″ class=”” id=””][fusion_text]

Claudette Colvin: Twice Toward Justice

by Phillip Hoose

[/fusion_text][/two_third][separator style_type=”single” top_margin=”” bottom_margin=”” sep_color=”” border_size=”” icon=”” icon_circle=”” icon_circle_color=”” width=”” alignment=”center” class=”” id=””][title size=”2″ content_align=”left” style_type=”underline” sep_color=”” class=”” id=””]Historical Fiction[/title][one_third last=”no” spacing=”yes” center_content=”no” hide_on_mobile=”no” background_color=”” background_image=”” background_repeat=”no-repeat” background_position=”left top” border_size=”0px” border_color=”” border_style=”” padding=”” margin_top=”” margin_bottom=”” animation_type=”” animation_direction=”” animation_speed=”0.1″ class=”” id=””][imageframe lightbox=”no” lightbox_image=”” style_type=”none” bordercolor=”” bordersize=”0px” borderradius=”0″ stylecolor=”” align=”none” link=”” linktarget=”_self” animation_type=”0″ animation_direction=”down” animation_speed=”0.1″ hide_on_mobile=”no” class=”” id=””] [/imageframe][/one_third][two_third last=”yes” spacing=”yes” center_content=”no” hide_on_mobile=”no” background_color=”” background_image=”” background_repeat=”no-repeat” background_position=”left top” border_size=”0px” border_color=”” border_style=”” padding=”” margin_top=”” margin_bottom=”” animation_type=”” animation_direction=”” animation_speed=”0.1″ class=”” id=””][fusion_text]

One Crazy Summer

by Rita Williams-Garcia

[/fusion_text][/two_third][one_third last=”no” spacing=”yes” center_content=”no” hide_on_mobile=”no” background_color=”” background_image=”” background_repeat=”no-repeat” background_position=”left top” border_size=”0px” border_color=”” border_style=”” padding=”” margin_top=”” margin_bottom=”” animation_type=”” animation_direction=”” animation_speed=”0.1″ class=”” id=””][imageframe lightbox=”no” lightbox_image=”” style_type=”none” bordercolor=”” bordersize=”0px” borderradius=”0″ stylecolor=”” align=”none” link=”” linktarget=”_self” animation_type=”0″ animation_direction=”down” animation_speed=”0.1″ hide_on_mobile=”no” class=”” id=””] [/imageframe][/one_third][two_third last=”yes” spacing=”yes” center_content=”no” hide_on_mobile=”no” background_color=”” background_image=”” background_repeat=”no-repeat” background_position=”left top” border_size=”0px” border_color=”” border_style=”” padding=”” margin_top=”” margin_bottom=”” animation_type=”” animation_direction=”” animation_speed=”0.1″ class=”” id=””][fusion_text]

Roll of Thunder Hear My Cry

by Mildred Taylor

[/fusion_text][/two_third][one_third last=”no” spacing=”yes” center_content=”no” hide_on_mobile=”no” background_color=”” background_image=”” background_repeat=”no-repeat” background_position=”left top” border_size=”0px” border_color=”” border_style=”” padding=”” margin_top=”” margin_bottom=”” animation_type=”” animation_direction=”” animation_speed=”0.1″ class=”” id=””][imageframe lightbox=”no” lightbox_image=”” style_type=”none” bordercolor=”” bordersize=”0px” borderradius=”0″ stylecolor=”” align=”none” link=”” linktarget=”_self” animation_type=”0″ animation_direction=”down” animation_speed=”0.1″ hide_on_mobile=”no” class=”” id=””] [/imageframe][/one_third][two_third last=”yes” spacing=”yes” center_content=”no” hide_on_mobile=”no” background_color=”” background_image=”” background_repeat=”no-repeat” background_position=”left top” border_size=”0px” border_color=”” border_style=”” padding=”” margin_top=”” margin_bottom=”” animation_type=”” animation_direction=”” animation_speed=”0.1″ class=”” id=””][fusion_text]

The Watsons Go to Birmingham

by Christopher Paul Curtis

[/fusion_text][/two_third][fusion_text]Click edit button to change this text.[/fusion_text]

Grateful? Put a Penny in Your Shoe

[one_full last=”yes” spacing=”yes” center_content=”no” hide_on_mobile=”no” background_color=”” background_image=”” background_repeat=”no-repeat” background_position=”left top” border_size=”0px” border_color=”” border_style=”” padding=”” margin_top=”” margin_bottom=”” animation_type=”” animation_direction=”” animation_speed=”0.1″ class=”” id=””][title size=”1″ content_align=”left” style_type=”none” sep_color=”” class=”” id=””]Grateful? Put a Penny in Your Shoe[/title][/one_full][fusion_text]In my elementary school library, it became a tradition the week before Thanksgiving to put a penny in my shoe and invite the children who visited the library to do the same.

The challenge: Keep the penny in your shoe while you are wearing it until Thanksgiving Day.
The purpose: Every time you feel the penny think of something you are grateful for.

The discussion with the children as the basket of pennies circled the group was always enlightening and heartwarming. Gratitude for parents, family, friends, food and homes were always expressed. I would mention gratitude for books and the ability to read. We would always spend some time talking about our favorite books. Then more unusual feelings were expressed like gratitude for eyebrows because a friend lost her hair due to cancer treatments and she doesn’t have eyebrows to stop the sweat from dripping in her eyes. Gratitude for a doctor that helped save a loved-one’s life. Gratitude for a night light because the dark is scary.

The second year I taught this library lesson, when the basket reached a particular sixth-grade boy he simply passed the basket on to the next student. The boy said he didn’t need a penny because he still had one in his shoe from last year. Surprised and impressed I asked why. He said the penny helped him remember an older sibling he was grateful for who was away from home for an extended period of time. He planned to keep the penny in his shoe until the sibling returned home. The following years, there were always a couple of students who had kept their penny in their shoe for the entire year for a very special reason.

As the children walked around the library I would often hear, “I can feel the penny in my shoe,” followed by another student asking, “What are you grateful for?” Children love to have a chance to talk about what matters most to them.

This became a beloved tradition in our library and might be a fun tradition to start with your family. So tuck a penny in your shoe and let the grateful thoughts flow.  

Here are a couple of picture books I love to share around Thanksgiving. This nonfiction title by an incredible author reminds us that a “bold, brave, stubborn and smart” woman saved Thanksgiving for all of us.

thank you sarah

This delightful book is a great read aloud and makes everyone smile, especially when they discover how the children hid the turkeys. Enjoy!

nightbefore

25% OFF regular kit price with a RIK-a-Month subscription

 

 [/fusion_text]

11 Things to Teach Children About Veterans Day – November 11th

Veterans

[one_full last=”yes” spacing=”yes” center_content=”no” hide_on_mobile=”no” background_color=”” background_image=”” background_repeat=”no-repeat” background_position=”left top” border_size=”0px” border_color=”” border_style=”” padding=”” margin_top=”” margin_bottom=”” animation_type=”” animation_direction=”” animation_speed=”0.1″ class=”” id=””][title size=”1″ content_align=”left” style_type=”default” sep_color=”” class=”” id=””]11 Things to Teach Children About Veterans Day – November 11th[/title][/one_full][fusion_text]The first week of November, during my library lessons, I would ask the children what important day is coming up this month? They would always respond, “Thanksgiving.” I would tell them that there is another important day besides Thanksgiving that happens on November 11th. Then the children would often say something like, “Oh yeah, isn’t that when the planes crashed into the twin towers?”

Veterans Day is often overlooked or completely forgotten. We hardly think about it until we notice flags on our way to work or hear a news story, realizing only then that it is Veterans Day. Actually, teaching children about Veterans Day and thanking our veterans is a great way to start November, the month of gratitude.

Here are 11 things to teach children about Veterans Day.

1. Veterans Day is on November 11th and the date has significance. After World War I, an armistice was signed on the 11th day of the 11th month at the 11th hour following what was hoped to be “the war to end all wars.” Originally called Armistice Day, the name was eventually changed to Veterans Day when the hope of no more war ended with World War II.

2. On Veterans Day at 11 a.m. a special ceremony honoring all veterans takes place in Washington D.C. in Arlington National Cemetery at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier. In 1921 an unknown World War I soldier was buried in this sacred place that symbolizes respect and reverence for all American veterans.

3. A veteran is anyone who has served in the United States armed forces — Army, Navy, Air Force, Marines and Coast Guard. Children are fascinated by books about the military and love the challenge of being able to name all five branches. You can find nonfiction books like these and many more at your school or local library to expand their understanding of the military.

military books

4. Veterans Day is different than Memorial Day. On Memorial Day we honor those who gave their lives serving our country. On Veterans Day we honor all who have honorably served our country, particularly those who are living. Informational books like these are great to read to elementary age children to help them understand these two different days of remembrance.

vet day book

memorial day

5. Veterans are men and women, moms and dads, sons and daughters, brothers and sisters. Sometimes children think veterans are only male. These two books written for young children show males and females in the military.

hero dad hero mom

6. There are both young and old veterans. Children are usually quite surprised to learn people in their 20s and 30s served in the military and are veterans.

7. Veterans serve in the armed forces in both wartime and times of peace. I’ve often heard children say, “my grandpa served in the Navy but he didn’t go to war so he’s not a veteran.” Anytime someone honorably serves in the armed forces, they are protecting our country and deserve our respect and thanks.

8. Men and women who have honorably served in our military but are no longer serving are veterans. Children sometimes say, “my cousin was in the army so she used to be a veteran, but she isn’t anymore.” Those who have formerly served in the armed forces are veterans.

9. SomeAmerica's White Table veterans don’t get to come home after a war and may still be missing (MIA). I love to share this book with my students in the library and set a white table for them to see. Reading this book as a family and setting your own white table is a simple and wonderful way to honor the veterans we can’t thank for their service personally or with a written note. You can visit the author’s website for more information about this book and tradition.

10. You may personally know a veteran. Children are proud when they realize they know a veteran. Once they learn about veterans, children are excited to share the stories of the veterans they know. Give them an opportunity to share those stories and learn new stories about veterans close to them. If you don’t personally know a veteran, you can teach your children using these books about one of the most amazing veterans I have been blessed to know, Gail Halvorsen, the remarkable Candy Bomber of the Berlin Airlift.

candy bomber mercedes

11. Veterans are surprised when they are remembered and thanked. Each year, the children who visited my library were invited to make thank you cards for veterans. Those cards were given to veterans the children knew, veterans in our small community, and veterans in care centers and hospitals. It wasn’t uncommon to hear a surprised and heart-felt, “Thank you for remembering me,” from the recipients.

On Veterans Day we honor ALL who have served. How will you thank a veteran on November 11th?

Veterans Day[/fusion_text]

Reading with Dad

Boy reading with dad

[one_full last=”yes” spacing=”yes” center_content=”no” hide_on_mobile=”no” background_color=”” background_image=”” background_repeat=”no-repeat” background_position=”left top” border_size=”0px” border_color=”” border_style=”” padding=”” margin_top=”” margin_bottom=”” animation_type=”” animation_direction=”” animation_speed=”0.1″ class=”” id=””][title size=”1″ content_align=”left” style_type=”default” sep_color=”” class=”” id=””]Reading with Dad[/title][/one_full][fusion_text]We had a conversation recently with a dad who used a Reading Incentive Kit™ as he read Ready Freddy! Camping Catastrophe! by Abby Klein to his four-year-old son. Because of other commitments, they missed reading together one night.  The son was upset and insisted they read together the next morning before they had breakfast.

When they reached the end of the story the son was craving more. The incentives were compelling and motivating, but the part of this dad’s story that thrilled us was that it was the reading experience the child most wanted to continue. Reading with dad was the biggest reward.

Opening the RIK packages along the way, discussing the think pieces and making connections to the story with the RIK “prizes” enhanced the reading experience, but the RIK packages are like the voices of the cheering crowd that motivate, encourage and inspire as this boy begins his journey down the satisfying lifetime path of reading.

Keep reading, Bradley! We are behind you all the way.

25% Regular Price of the Kit with RIK-a-Month Subscription

[/fusion_text]

Foster Independent Reading in Children

The first chapter book my daughter ever read all on her own was with a kit and in one sitting.

“My kids have had a blast reading with the Reading Incentive Kits. I have used these with 4 of my children and all have benefitted. My older, experienced readers have become more active readers because of these kits. They think more about what they are reading, make connections to the story and characters they read about and make predictions while they read. The kits force a child to stop and do this in a fun way that feels like a reward instead of a chore. I have especially noticed a difference for my child who has a hard time finishing books. In the past, this particular child gets excited about a book because of its cover or the recommendation from a friend, but has not been able to keep the enthusiasm long enough to finish a book. With your kits she is able to keep the excitement going throughout the whole book and has now completed several books which has made her a much more confident reader. The first chapter book she ever read all on her own was with a kit and in one sitting. She just couldn’t wait to get to the next package. She read and read until the last page and had never been more proud of that accomplishment.”

Thanks, Natalie, for sharing your story. Many people have shared similar stories of how reading with a Reading Incentive Kit helps foster independent reading in children. —ReadingWithRIK.com

25-Off-2

Reading Motivation – the Easy Way

I rarely see my son finish a book. But with the incentive kits he was picking up a book and finishing it in a day or two.

In this RIK Reader Success Story, Janessa shares how a Reading Incentive Kit makes reading motivation easy.

“I have a daughter who is an avid reader. The kits provided enrichment materials that helped her engage with books in a fun, new way.  I have a son who is more of a reluctant reader. I rarely see him finish a book he has started reading. But with the incentive kits, he was picking up a book and finishing it in a day or two. I was amazed.  The kits helped him discover that he really does like to read!”

Discover one of the most effective reading motivation tools available at ReadingWithRIK.com

25-Off-2

Developing a love of reading with fun

[fusion_text]We all know it. Motivation from in front with a carrot is much better than from behind with a whip. The same principle applies to parents who want to instill in their children a love of reading.

Elementary school librarian, Paula Ruesch recognized that principle and started a successful summer book camp for 2nd to 7th graders. Her motivation was the number of students who returned to school in the fall having never read a single book during summer break. Her goal was to make reading extra fun and help children avoid the “summer slide.” The summer slide is the academic backslide that children can experience after a summer of a little too much mental unwinding.

Research indicates that children who read four to six books during the summer are able to avoid the summer slide in reading. With that in mind, helping children read five books in five weeks became the goal of the summer book camp. Even without the demands of school, that was a tall order for most children.

Jaxon_IMG_2648

For an hour each week, the children participated in fun activities that reinforced what they were discovering in their books and helped make reading a social activity. But even that wasn’t enough to get some of the children over the mental wall that a book can sometimes be for a young reader who hasn’t yet developed a love of reading. That’s when the idea of a Reading Incentive Kit™ came to Paula. She called it RIK™ for short. Inside each RIK is a series of numbered and labeled packages containing surprises and a “think piece” related to the story. The think piece helps the reader “think” about what they just read or what they will read.  The reader opens the packages at requested intervals throughout the story. As readers progress through the book, they continue to open packages, which keeps them motivated, increases comprehension, and makes reading extra fun.

Reading Incentive Kit inspires children with a love of reading

Paula packaged the initial RIK kits for her book camp attendees in brown paper lunch sacks. But despite its humble presentation, the Reading Incentive Kit was a hit with the children. Parents took notice of the fact that their reluctant readers were now devouring a book in a day or two, and their comprehension was going through the roof. Those same parents (and grandparents) started asking where they could get more kits.

Paula continued to create more kits, which she has tested and refined in the laboratory of her RIK Book Camp. For the last four years a continual stream of success stories has come back to Paula. Children who were hesitant to read are now confident and happy readers. Parents and children alike have thanked Paula for the start she gave them in developing a love of reading.

“Every time I walk past a stack of RIK boxes,” says Paula, “I see in each kit a child interacting with a great story. My hope is that a tiny seed will eventually take hold in that child and grow into a lifetime love of reading.”

Children everywhere can now benefit year round by subscribing to RIK-a-Month and receive a kit with its accompanying book each month. Subscriptions are available for ages 5-8, ages 8-10, and ages 10-13.

ReadingWithRIK.com[/fusion_text][five_sixth last=”yes” spacing=”yes” center_content=”no” hide_on_mobile=”no” background_color=”” background_image=”” background_repeat=”no-repeat” background_position=”left top” border_size=”0px” border_color=”” border_style=”” padding=”” margin_top=”” margin_bottom=”” animation_type=”” animation_direction=”” animation_speed=”0.1″ class=”” id=””][/five_sixth]